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                    A consumer play not yet served by Amazon. Photo courtesy of Christopher Michel.

“Warren Buffet just confirmed the death of retail as we know it,” – that’s the headline of an article published by Business Insider last week. If your startup is in the consumer retail space, you should take notice.

Warren Buffet is usually spot on when it comes to having long-term vision. To illuminate this long-term view and how it applies to the consumer retail outlook, here is an exchange he and Charlie Munger, vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway, had at their most recent annual meeting earlier this month:

Warren Buffet: “The department store is online now, I have no illusion that 10 years from now will look the same as today, and there will be a few things along the way that surprise us, the world has evolved, and it’s going to keep evolving, but the speed is increasing.”

Charlie Munger: “It would certainly be unpleasant if we were in the department-store business.”

As strategic CFOs for consumer startups, we’ve learned 3 lessons we’d like to share in order to help you position your startup to attract the investment that will bring success in the evolving retail landscape that Mr. Buffett refers to.

  1. Don’t be in the crosshairs of Amazon

People love Amazon. Consumers are used to finding and ordering on their site or app in a painless and quick way. You do not want to be solving a problem they don’t have. You therefore will have a hard time raising money for an online business selling things that can be easily found and bought on Amazon, like regular books, toys, and small electronics. If you focus on these types of commodity items, investors will have a hard time believing you can source your products for less, or get them to the customer faster, or even get people to visit your site in the first place and transact there when they already have Amazon Prime.

Yet, there is hope for your startup. Although it may seem like they already sell everything, Amazon didn’t get to every category at once (for instance, they are just now getting to furniture and groceries). They didn’t do every category well on the first shot either (case in point: fashion). Your opportunity to play alongside this online giant is by focusing on a niche they are presently not choosing to focus on or have historically had execution challenges with because of obstacles related to merchandising, vendor relations, or other factors. A complex selling process also opens up a window of opportunity, for instance, a market where you need to customize the product online (like glasses), or a market where regulatory compliance makes Amazon’s standard checkout process insufficient (think pet RX), or areas where merchandising is key (like designer fashion).

  1. Don’t write off physical retail for dead

If all it took to imagine the future of retail was visualizing empty malls and a world where every purchase is made on a mobile app, a sharp guy like Buffet would not have said that “there will be a few things along the way that surprise us.”  Although news about the death of bricks-and-mortar retail and retailer Chapter 11 notices surrounds us, many local shops are doing quite well. Online brands are building and emerging faster than ever. One of their “secrets” seems to be to open physical retail along the way for brand support, and for retail “showroom-ing”. This term is used when an online brand (like Warby Parker or Bonobos) opens a bricks-and-mortar location that is open to the public in order to let the customer touch and feel the product. This allows the company to get closer to their end customer and acquire feedback that will be essential for future product development. Often these new retail showrooms carry very limited or even no inventory for purchase, and customers need to wait for their purchases to be mailed to them, as if they had purchased online, while they have had the benefit of a physical try on.

The destruction in legacy retail is a naturally occurring forest fire; it is creative-destruction that opens up space, and creates opportunities for new brands in the form of short- and long-term and pop up leases in premium, high street locations and malls. These opportunities would have been unthinkable just a few years ago. If you think bricks-and-mortar are dead, think of millennials; as connected as they are, they also like to stroll their local neighborhood on weekends and find stuff they can buy. Tourists from areas of the country less dense with early adopters, and international arrivals in particular, can also be introduced to new, emerging brands – in fashion, home, electronics, even food & beverage and health & wellness – through strategically placed physical outposts in high traffic locations. Physical space is here to stay for those startups that are creative and use it to augment their digitally-driven business models.

  1. Inventory-lite is favored by investors

The model invented by Zara and H&M has put many former titans of the mall on the brink of irrelevance – and they did not do it by shifting consumers online. Fast fashion companies like Zara, H&M, and Forever 21 know that consumers are fickle and what is hot now can become old news next month. Their entire model is designed to take new styles from the designer’s desk to the shelf in just a few weeks, without squeezing their suppliers. As a result, their initial buys are shallow and frequent, and stores only carry current stuff that will not need to be heavily discounted because it went out of fashion while sitting in a warehouse waiting to be shipped – which is a huge issue their competitors have.

Having a lite – or even zero inventory –  business model reduces the investment in working capital, which in consumer businesses, is often a risky asset. Getting to inventory-lite requires high inventory turns. High inventory turns are made possible by a kick-ass concept-to-shelf design process, aided by superior logistics. Even better than inventory-lite is inventory-zero. Inventory-zero is inherently less risky, requires the least working capital, results in the highest operating margins, and has a tendency to translate into a free cash flow machine. VCs know this. Think eBay, MercadoLibre, Grubhub, and Opentable, who don’t even own anything they sell. They are the toll-takers of the internet, taking a piece of other people’s transactions, but never actually taking the risk of owning anything or the expense of warehousing or shipping anything. These agency businesses are fantastic business models, but they tend to be winner-take-all because of the importance of scale and network effects, so when attempting to build a toll-taker business, be prepared to answer questions about how you will acquire your customers, how much it will cost to do so, and who your competitors are.

Use them to fine-tune your value proposition

These three things to have in mind when formulating the plan for your consumer startup are by no means exhaustive… the comprehensive list of potential ways to maximize the value of your consumer startup would be a very long one. These are however three key things you should keep in mind as you try to define your value proposition for VCs. They are also key items to keep in mind as you prepare your strategic plan and do your long-term modeling to ensure you have an attractive beachfront to compete supported by smarter finance.

                  To grow faster, follow their footsteps and learn from their mistakes.

For this article, I found a quote from Steven Dunn that says that “You can never make the same mistake twice because the second time you make it, it’s not a mistake, it’s a choice.” Quite fitting regarding how we can learn strategic finance lessons from second-time CEOs and avoid some of the mistakes they made in their startups the first time around. At Burkland Associates, we give strategic finance cover to many CEOs that have been there before, here are some of the lessons we’ve learned from them:

  1. Embark in serious business modeling early on

A few years ago, RedRocketVC came up with a checklist for startup success. One of the items on their list is “Flexibility to fine-tune model and navigate challenges.” We see it and hear it from our CEOs time and again: modeling is one of the very few “must haves” for any startup. For a startup, business modeling and finance modeling is exactly the same thing. It may seem like a theoretically painful process, especially early on, but it is definitely one that will yield many benefits. A sound financial model that you can iterate over time, provides clarity on the current business and also illuminates the strategic choices available. Furthermore, this model will focus product, sales, business development and management on the same strategic plan and the levers available to make it viable.

Another reason to invest time in modeling is that a sound financial model will help you see the holes in your go-to-market approach that an experienced investor will detect at first sight, enabling you to bulletproof your investor pitches. Also, strong financial modeling will help a founder show investors the tangible steps to transform their idea first into a successful revenue model (generates revenue but burns cash) and eventually into a successful business (generates both revenue AND cash!).

  1. Do not confuse accounting with strategic finance

Although good accounting is a basic skill every startup needs, its role needs to be understood. It is natural for a good accountant to become a “right-hand” guy for a CEO early on. After all, the accounting person usually knows more about the overall business than other management team members. Thus the CEO will often use them as a sounding board for discussing future plans for the business.

This is where things can go wrong. Good accountants are trained to look in the rearview mirror to make sure you do not leave out anything from the financial scorecard that provides an honest assessment of historical company performance. What they are not trained to do, however, is look out the front windshield and see what’s coming and/or which strategic turn the company should take.

That is the role of a strategic finance professional, who can use both the rearview mirror as well as look out the front windshield to help a company navigate around the obstacles and find the opportunities in the road ahead. Accounting and strategic financial professional are very complimentary and should be brought in as early as possible in a startup’s life — and remember, they are more affordable than ever since you can rent both in the new sharing economy!

  1. Maintain financial discipline

The third lesson in finance we can learn from second-time CEOs concerns financial discipline. Financial discipline implies running your business based on both your financial model (which is forward-looking) and your accounting (which is backward-looking). Take these two extremes. First, most first-time CEOs have a good innate sense of their monthly burn (they usually are signing the checks!) and yet they are often surprised when the money runs out.

Why? Often founders do not want to really think about what is happening to their dwindling cash and without a true cash flow statement it is easier to not think about what is coming. Real financial statements with a solid cash flow statement provides founders with an unambiguous picture of what is happening to their cash including how important payment terms and collections are to making your payroll in the coming months before that next fund-raising round. This becomes especially important with the big-name clients that often will only accept 60-day payment terms when most of your own expenses need to be paid in less than 30 days.

Strategic finance as an early partner to grow with confidence 

Like second-time CEOs, most successful first-time entrepreneurs eventually come to realize the finance function is more than just parental supervision required by their institutional investors. The only question is how much time (and opportunity cost) passes before they recognize that strategic finance is a vital ongoing partner in company success…just like development, sales, marketing, and customer success.

Photo courtesy of Christopher Michel.

Timing is everything when it comes to finance talent.

Nowadays, when startups raise money from VCs, especially in the early stages, line items in their financial projections do matter. For instance, in an era when all marketing tools give you freemiums or super low entry price points, and social media rules over mass media, your marketing budget can’t be what it was for startups a few years ago. Some VCs will go as far as saying you don’t need money to do good marketing until you grow the business on a dime. The same is true for finance. Why would you need a CFO when you can rent one? After financing is complete, what would a CFO do all day anyway?

Last week I was invited to do a talk at the inaugural Veterans Conference in San Francisco. When thinking how to make my talk useful and memorable to veteran founders and CEOs of early stage companies, I came up with the 2×2 matrix below (I’m an HBS graduate – we’re required to do a 2×2 matrix at least once a week for life!). Anyways, the chart provides a framework to help CEOs and founders distinguish between various finance and accounting roles, and to understand when and how to engage the right resource along their journey.

Framework for Finance Talent

The first thing to note are the axes. The progression to a full time CFO is natural as the level of help you need depends on the age of your startup. In an era when you can rent and not buy everything, finance talent is no exception. You need to strike a balance between looking at the past to ensure everything is in order (bookkeeping) and looking at the future to ensure you grow in the right direction (strategic finance).

The good news is that you can have your cake and eat it too!

Timing is everything

Here’s how it can play out. At the beginning, pre-seed and pre-revenue, you only need a bookkeeper. I recommend you to hire yourself as this guy – it will help you get a good handle on the levers that drive your business, and it will not take more than a couple of hours of your time every week. Then you start growing, the dogs eat the dog food so you raise a seed. At this point, your attention needs to focus on revenue and you need a professional bookkeeper. It is at this point that you also need to rent a CFO who can help you, giving you just a few hours per week, to lay the foundations of your business model so you can think about the future from a finance perspective (remember, bookkeepers are trained to look at the past).

Then comes the point when you will need more CFO cover. From Series A through D you will need to cover all bases. You need your bookkeeper. You also need more time from your on-demand CFO, who can help you with historical and pro forma financial statements, unit economics, raising capital and business modeling. Eventually you need to complete this team with a controller to build and improve processes and systems and ensure GAAP accounting), and maybe FP&A Analysts to support detailed and compressive operational metrics and dashboards and with corporate performance management tools.

Ideally, there comes a point in this journey, usually close to an IPO or an exit, when you stop renting your CFO and buy one. You should feel good – you’ve graduated to the next level and you need not only the full time of a CFO, but her undivided attention and a deep knowledge of what makes your company tick.

There’s a time for everything. Like in all graduations, you’ll have mixed feelings. You’re not a startup anymore.

Photo courtesy of Navy veteran, Silicon Valley entrepreneur and photographer Christopher Michel.

Renting a CFO can help you have a strategic partner to realize your vision (photo courtesy of Silicon Valley entrepreneur and photographer Christopher Michel).

Startups are hard.  Most fail.  Even ones with great ideas.  So, how do you maximize your odds of success?  Hire the best team you can afford.  Including a Strategic Chief Financial Officer with the skills, experience and vision to be your business partner and trusted advisor.  Muhammad Ali had Angelo Dundee.  King Henry VIII had Thomas Cromwell.  Luke Skywalker had Obi-Wan Kenobe.  Who’s got your back?  It could be your part-time CFO.

Can’t you get away with just an accountant?  In a word, “no”.  Accountants are important and help you figure out what’s happened in the past and report the same to your internal and external stakeholders.  But you are an early-stage company.  You need to drive the bus by looking ahead through the windshield, not behind in the rear-view mirror.  Smarter finance is forward looking – it helps you chart the best course.

Shouldn’t you be doing this yourself as the CEO?  Again, “no”.  Best case, you are actually capable of filling this role.  But this isn’t the best use of your precious time. You need to drive the company’s product and sales, build the team and be the company’s face to the outside world. Time spent in finance is time spent away from your highest and best purpose.  Worst case, you screw it up.

But can you afford and attract a top-quality CFO?  Yes!  Because you don’t need this resource full-time and can pay only for what you need.  We live in an on-demand world.  Don’t buy servers – rent time from AWS.  Don’t buy a car – book an Uber.  Don’t buy a vacation home – go on Airbnb.  And don’t hire a full-time CFO (yet) – rent one from a reputable On-demand CFO firm.  You probably only need 0.5-2.0 days per week, can find A-list talent with expertise in your field and be up and running in days.  And when you’re ready to make a change, it’s simple to move on or upgrade to a full-time resource.

Here are 5 key things you get from a part-time Strategic CFO:

  1. Build and maintain your business and financial model. How will you monetize your idea?  How should you price and deliver the product or service?  How much cash is required to hit your next milestone?  When do you need to raise your next round?  What resources can you afford and when should you deploy them?  How do you know if it’s working and when/how to pivot when the market gives you feedback?  Your CFO helps you answer all these questions.
  1. Leverage your management team so you can punch above your weight. The CFO is a core member of your team even if they are not sitting in your office 50 hours per week.  They bring expertise, contacts and credibility to your company and can help you manage all the internal/administrative functions so your time can remain focused on building and growing the top line.  A proven CFO also gives board members, investors and other outside stakeholders confidence in you and the company.
  1. Be your strategic partner and key sounding board. CEO is a lonely job, even in the biggest companies.  The best CEOs have trusted strategic advisors that they can rely on to help them execute their plan and give them honest feedback.  This is hard in an early-stage company where you can’t really afford to build a large team of experienced talent.  And more times than not, the rest of your senior team is drinking from the same Kool-Aid jug that you are – that’s why they’re there.  Your investors and advisors can help play an important role here, but they have lots of other demands on their time and priorities.  Your CFO is dedicated to your success and can bring critical outside perspective.  Most likely, he or she has seen many of the issues you’re facing before – and can access the knowledge of the rest of their firm on your behalf.
  1. Increase your access to the capital you need. Cash is the lifeblood of your company.  Most likely you will want to tap external sources now or in the future.  This could be from equity, debt, strategic partnering, public offerings, M&A or some other source.  Your CFO can help guide you on how to approach these capital sources, how to craft the right story, answer their questions and due diligence requests, negotiate and close the right deal and maintain good relationships with these new partners post-closing.  He or she will also make sure you’re always ready to raise the next round – preferably before you need it.
  1. Immediate return on investment. Because you only pay for what you use, a part-time CFO can be surprisingly affordable.  And if they deliver on even a subset of what they have to offer, they should pay for themselves many times over in terms of both your bottom line and your probability of success.

Rent the CFO cover you need. No-brainer.

Are your sales people farmers or hunters (or maybe both)? Photo courtesy of Silicon Valley entrepreneur and photographer Christopher Michel.

A few weeks ago, our friends at Norwest Venture Partners (NVP) wrote an interesting article on how CFOs should approach sales compensation (Sales Compensation Leading Practices: Tips for Entrepreneurs Building Recurring Revenue Businesses, by Terri McFadden). We’ve seen how our portfolio companies share the pain of modeling for recurring revenue that Terri talks about when it comes to compensating their business development team. In her words, “recurring revenue can be a minefield for CFOs who are trying to figure out how to compensate their sales forces, she goes on to indicate that, “one false step can explode the ambitions of a company trying to establish itself in the market.”

You definitely don’t want to be DOA by not paying close attention to how to create a compensation plan that makes your SaaS recurring revenue business model one your team can sell effectively. We’ve come across clients who created a plan on the fly by relying on their accountants to model it, and undoing it is not fun. That’s why I found the NVP post quite useful to share and expand on in this article.

NVP wrote their article following a round table with two experts from Accenture – Kevin Dobbs, Everything-as-a-Service Practice Lead, and Mark Wachter, Managing Director of Sales Strategy. Below is what they learned.

  1. Align incentives and strategy in planning

Sounds straightforward, right? You would be surprised how many times this obvious action is ignored. I think the culprit is speed: your time as a CEO in a young company is spent on product and actual selling, so thinking strategically about compensation seems like a luxury you have no time for. Terri writes that “the complexity comes from defining your key success metrics, how they are tracked, setting goals, what success looks like and then how do you want to pay for these results.” This is exactly where you can use cover from a part-time CFO – all the points their article refers to are part of financial planning and support to tie your incentives and strategies to the fabric of your business model, and keep a close eye as they progress.

  1. Compensate salespeople according to whether they are “hunters” or “farmers.”

For most SaaS companies, hunters are their sales people and farmers are their customer success people. Even if they start out the same, eventually, you need to separate these two groups in your financials and then operationally. How can a part-time CFO help you here? Hunters and farmers need completely different incentives. Hunters go for the big fish; farmers nurture that catch and make sure they reproduce (think renewals). A CFO can help you model compensation to reward both groups differently, according to their incentives, and evolve that model over time as your business grows and your customer success people become more specialized. In practice, the process of designing incentives for different sales behaviors is one of trial and error, so that it can be evolved as these roles change. At certain stages in your trajectory, hunters farm and farmers hunt, and you have to track and evolve incentives around this dynamic with cover from a seasoned CFO that can see the world from the eyes of your sales team.

  1. Establish quotas correctly

You don’t need to go to a round table to know that. However, our experience helping CEOs with strategic finance actually coincides with what the Accenture experts told NVP: “When it comes to setting quotas, most organizations don’t set sales quotas correctly.” Correctly is the key term here. All companies set sales quotas, but setting them in a way that works – and keeps working over time – is actually tricky. Low base/high commission? The reverse? On total ARR? New ARR? What level of quota?  When to change them? Well thought-out quotas reflect key elements of actual performance such as the length of your sales cycle, how much control do your reps have on the sale, whether you price low to go in, the importance of renewals, etc. To add complexity to this, all these elements evolve over time, so they need to be fine-tuned to keep sales quotas effective at driving sales. A part-time CFO with experience working with sales teams can ensure you keep your eye on the ball regarding setting up and fine-tuning sales quotas for your team.

Thinking strategically regarding your sales machine from day one will result in more confident growth and will attract the best people to your team. Terri at NVP puts it well when she writes that, “If you want your own recurring revenue business to drive a smooth path to success, you must set up a sales and commission plan that works in synchromesh with your strategy and goals.” I would only add that a CEO and a VP of Sales can do it with less pain and more effectiveness with the help of a CFO who thinks about the long-term implications of sales compensation and helps them model incentives, compensation and quotas to grow with confidence.

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The CEO & Co-founder of Front wrote about her experience raising their Series A.  It contains several insights such as:

  • VCs will never stop asking questions so you’ll have to know when to stop answering.
  • The metrics you mention will become the metrics you’re evaluated by.
  • A more condensed process minimizes the distraction from running the business.  (This is another variable to add when considering who to raise from; in addition to valuation, investment size & terms).
  • Due Diligence will be “ten times” worse than settling the deal
The entire post is worth a read. Here she is.

 

We’ve been closely following the emerging trends in the SaaS business model. Several of our customers businesses revolve around it and, as most other tech models, it is going through a transformative change. One of the most insightful articles we’ve read lately about this transformation  comes from Techcrunch. On November 13, our good friend and business school classmate, Sequoia partner Aaref Hilaly wrote a story smartly titled “Why the next great SaaS company will look nothing like Salesforce.” In it, Aaref points out that the newest crop of SaaS models turns the notion that to be sticky, a SaaS model has to become the “System of Record” (SoR) which used to be “the single source of truth, for customers’ most valuable information, such as customer records or employee data” like Salesforce. He adds that the emerging opportunity for SaaS is to become “Systems of Engagement” (SoE), meaning apps that employees actually use to get their work done” like Slack,  one of the most “sticky” business applications, now the most valuable private cloud company according to Forbes.

Check it out here. Aaref’s article is quite interesting and goes deep regarding how this new business model for SaaS not only makes sense, it solves the real problem of “creating systems of engagement that get users and revenue, by leveraging data in the systems of record.”

This Thanksgiving week, Series A startups can be thankful for your funding, but realize that the B Round is now the tougher round and the time to start preparing is now.  This presentation by Jed Katz (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jedkatz), who is the managing director at Javelin Venture Partners (https://javelinvp.com) explains how to do that. Jed posits that your next round of financing is much closer than you think, which catches some Founders by surprise. To prepare, he gives tips on setting 12-month goals, making cash last, managing & leveraging your Board, creating separate roadmaps for Sales & Engineering, and using the right metrics. Note how creating a brand serves recruits and investors in addition to customers. We especially like his final “words of wisdom,” that, unlike the perfunctory summary in some presentations, are useful and action-oriented.

These are valuable tips from a VC pro who’s seen everything. Check them out.

This curated selection of quotes from Marc Andreessen provides insight into how Venture Capital works.  Insights include:
– Almost all of a VC’s return comes from one or two disproportionate successes.
– The breakout successes are from areas that were against the grain of consensus.
– Success begets success as it attracts more capital, talent & word-of-mouth.  Also failure begets failure.
– VCs must go to meetings to learn rather than teach.
– Startup teams trump ideas because teams can adapt.
– Declining to invest in winners is a bigger VC mistake than investing in losers. Most VCs turned down most big successes.
– VCs spend most of their time trying to fix their losers and not on helping their winners [Should they change that? -Ed]
– The shift to software will accelerate innovation because it’s so easy to make & change.
And from the commentary:
– The benefit of disruptive technology is often in breakout value or dramatic cost decreases.  This is missed from measures like GDP (which may actually decline with cost reduction) because those measures only capture transaction value, not consumer value (consumer surplus).
Successful Founders of several marquee startups offered their historic pitch decks along with commentary.  Notice they span different stages & rounds.  Also, see how pitches have evolved reaching back to 2005.