April 2018

A trove of profitable information may be hiding under your horizon.

Photo courtesy of Christopher Michel.

Are you overlooking a revenue opportunity?

In the past you could identify a location, sink a well and black gold would flow from the ground.  Today, all you need to access these riches is to identify data sources that already exist in your business and drill down into it, or information you could have access to, but have yet to collect.  With a bit of analysis and help, you can create new revenue streams by monetizing your un-tapped data, by thinking of it as “liquid gold,” while creating rules of engagement with your customers so that all this is transparent and safe for everybody.

A lesson from Facebook

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, who hopefully just learned the hard way that data presents huge opportunities provided you use it responsibly, recently described his business before Congress as a “community” (with 2.2 billion members), a vehicle to connect people all over the world.  In reality, Facebook is a data / advertising company whose currency is your information. It collects hundreds and sometimes thousands of data points from its users, aggregating and monetizing them by offering targeted advertising to various companies while maintaining control over them and making a fortune!  Mark’s net worth is currently $66 billion – all built with my information and yours.

You too may be sitting on a wealth of untapped data or the opportunity to collect it.  Most of us don’t like to stray from our core businesses; however, in today’s environment it’s imperative to grow and diversify. Plus, having this additional revenue stream may allow you to give your customers lower prices, just as Facebook can afford to be free as long as it can monetize information collected from their customers.  Mining existing data (customer lists, buying patterns, preferences, etc.) or creating simple mechanisms to capture it (apps, websites, discount and loyalty programs, collection of email addresses that access Wi-Fi at retail locations, etc.), enables you to collect, aggregate and monetize it.

Lose your fear of data

Many companies are reluctant to monetize the information they control for fear of breaching customer confidentiality.  However, if the problems Facebook is facing can teach us a lesson, data collection and data use can be part of a ‘covenant’ with our customers where they get some benefit in exchange for the rights to use their information to generate revenue via ads. This, when done properly, allows a company to maintain control over the data without losing customer trust.

One way to monetize your data is by focusing in your core industry and utilizing it to enhance your sales or offerings to assist industry partners in enhancing their sales, at a price.  Another is to think out-of-the-box and look at other verticals that may be interested in reaching the companies or consumers in your data base. The one thing to remember is that the goal is to facilitate the marketing effort while maintaining control over your data so that your customers’ trust is not weakened by having third parties misuse their information – which has contributed to Facebook’s current trust problems.  Ensuring this takes considerable planning and dedicated resources but enables you to continuously monetize data with confidence.  By following simple rules of engagement on third-party use of your information, each time a vendor needs to initiate a new marketing campaign, you create a new revenue opportunity without compromising it. This is the Facebook model: each bite of the apple generates additional revenue for your company and enables you to offer your customers lower prices or even a free service!

Your CFO can help

Like oil, data can be a blessing or a curse, depending on how careful you are when monetizing it. One of the ways a strategic CFO can help you is by applying some out-of-the-box thinking so that you can identify and collect it in a way that maintains your customers’ trust and monetize it with confidence.

“There’s nothing to fear but fear itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt

Photo courtesy of Christopher Michel.

Recently, our team read a fantastic book – Getting Naked, by Patrick Lencioni – that explores the journey from superficiality to deep empathy that amazing human relationships usually take. Amazing consulting relationships, being just one kind of human relationships, also follow this journey, starting as professional engagements and becoming meaningful relationships of loyalty and trust. The book explores why.

It turns out that consulting relationships that stay superficial in the name of looking “professional,” never move a consultant from a vendor to a trusted partner. This is a book that goes deep into the simple but powerful insight that growing a relationship – any relationship – is about becoming vulnerable. For a consultant, this openness results in a better understanding of the “whole,” enabling us to understand their business better by understanding their motivations, their strengths, their weaknesses, in short, their true needs. It is about a humble approach to consulting where you open up completely and show your human side. It is in this zone of humility and openness that loyal and sticky relationships can develop. The book is a call to open up by facing three fears that prevent us from building deep relationships.

The concept is surprisingly unsurprising: professional relationships are human relationships. There is no way around it. Like all lasting human relationships, professional ones also move from the superficial to the deep, as those involved open up to fearlessly expose their humanity with all the good and the bad that comes with it. It is this fearlessness that is the basis for the insight of this great little book.

Lencioni brings home this need for fearlessness that turns into trust and loyalty on both sides by exploring the three specific fears that prevent consultants from becoming trusted partners of their clients.

  1. Fear of losing the business

Like in dating, if you’re afraid of losing your partner, you will behave in a way that actually gets you there. Your relationship will stay superficial because you will avoid the “difficult” conversations that make a relationship more intimate.  In regards to consulting relationships, Lencioni puts it brilliantly: “ironically, though, this fear of losing the business actually hurts our ability to keep and increase the business, because it causes us to avoid dealing with the difficult things that engender greater loyalty and trust with the people we’re trying to serve.” This happens, he explains, because clients can “smell” that fear of losing their business makes us put our interest in keeping it before their interest in being helped.

  1. Fear of being embarrassed

This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most acclaimed movies of all time: 2001: A Space Odyssey. In it, pride causes HAL, an AI-enabled computer, to assume it is infallible, pushing it to eliminate all but one of the crew members, derailing the mission it was trying to maintain intact. It is pride, Lencioni writes, that keeps consultants from asking questions that may make them look ignorant or stupid. This leads to the second fatal fear in his book: the fear of being embarrassed. Nobody can look smart 24/7 in a deep relationship, vulnerability, which builds empathy, needs to go through the trial and error of making mistakes, sharing stupid ideas, and facing errors. In my experience, it is how one reacts to errors that shows a client what one is made of. A client will fire a consultant who tries to save face before firing one who owns their mistakes and problem-solves to correct them. As in personal relationships, wanting to be seen as smart is a turnoff. Smart people don’t yearn to be seen as so.

  1. Fear of feeling inferior

This final fear that prevents consulting relationships from taking their journey to loyalty and trust is also based on pride, but on a different kind. Lencioni writes that the “fear of feeling inferior is not about our intellectual pride, but rather about preserving our sense of importance and social standing relative to a client.” Interestingly, he reminds us that the word “service” comes from the same root as “servant,” and outstanding consultants who build loyal relationships overcome their need to feel important by serving, or in the author’s words, doing “whatever a client needs them to do to help them improve, even if that calls for the service provider to be overlooked or temporary looked down on.”

At the end of his insightful book about loyal relationships, Lencioni provides a practical list of actions that outstanding consultants can take to overcome the three fears and build a deeper relationship that grows roots. These practical actions are the following:

To fight your Fear of Losing the Business:

  • Always consult instead of sell
  • Give away the business
  • Tell the kind truth
  • Enter the danger

To fight your Fear of Being Embarrassed:

  • Ask dumb questions
  • Make dumb suggestions
  • Celebrate your mistakes

To fight your Fear of Feeling Inferior

  • Take a bullet for the client
  • Make everything about the client
  • Honor the client’s work
  • Do the dirty work

At the end of the day, Lencioni reminds us “we all have weaknesses, and if we try to cover them up, we’ll probably put ourselves in a situation of having to do more and more of what we aren’t good at.” Nurturing trust and loyalty in a consulting relationship requires us to put down our egos so that we become vulnerable by showing – not hiding – our weaknesses, by showing our humanity to ultimately generate the empathy we need for our relationship to go deep.

Become fearlessly human in your professional life! Realize that you can’t conveniently put your humanity in a drawer in the name of a “professional” relationship, because at the end of the day, all relationships are human.

Craft a sticky story of your company’s journey.

Photo courtesy of Christopher Michel.

Last week I had a Monday morning meeting with the founder of a pre-seed, self-funded company. We had been collaborating for almost a year and he told me that they had their first pitch competition in three days. He wanted to do a review of their pitch with me.

After a quick run through his pitch, I gave him my brutally honest take on it: “None of it was usable”

The deck would have been OK for an investor sit down, but it was not appropriate for a three minute pitch in front of an audience where the goal is not to attract investors but rather to win a competition – or at least to peak interest and to be memorable.  After all, win or not, you want them talking about you afterwards.  A totally different frame of mind is necessary in the prep and the delivery for an event like this.  You do not need to be a Ted Talk master, but you do need to tell an authentic story people will remember and connect with.

Unfortunately, they had already submitted the deck and could not make changes.  I pondered for a moment. The deck had one good slide so I advised them to just focus on that one slide and ignore the rest. As scary as it sounded, a good story focusing on one good visual was much better than a bad story focused on many bad visuals.

Here’s how we re-worked their pitch.

Make you and your story the focus of your pitch.  If your story is powerful when you sit down one-on-one, then it is simply a matter of figuring out how to translate it into one that captivates a large audience. So for my friend (founder), this meant it was time to break him down and build him back up.

We began by asking all sorts of questions….

  • Why did you start the company?
  • Are you really self-funded, what past success lets you do this?
  • Why should I invest in you.  What makes you special?
  • Who are you? What is your story?
  • What is your personal story that drove you to start the company?
  • What about your team, what makes them special?

Now, can you tell all this in no more than three powerful sentences?

Notice that not once did I ask about Sales Growth, Exit Strategy, MRR,  LTV or financial models, setting up the story is all about you and your story. If your story is compelling, the details can follow. It doesn’t work the other way around.

Here are my top 9 pitch tips that can help you weave a sticky story that is authentic.

  1. Watch Youtube videos of winning pitches:  Everything is online these days so watch past winners of this pitch competition and others of similar time criteria.  This was the aha moment with the company I was working with.  It is one thing for me to tell them what to do it is so much more powerful to see what successful peers have done.
  2. Be Memorable / Be Remembered: When 60 founders are pitching in one evening it is all about standing out from the crowd. Do something memorable, shocking but genuine.
  3. Tell your personal story:  Quickly let the audience know how you got here and why this is your passion and you are the one person in the universe that could come up with this product because of your unique background.  Let your personality come through.  Remember at this point they are investing in you as much as your product. Be Authentic, and true to self.
  4. Show, not tell: demonstrate your product:  Figure out a way to show what your product does even if it is software.  You need to have an aha moment with the crowd.  If they don’t get it nothing else matters.
  5. Tell them how big the opportunity is:  Revenue and traction is not necessary at this point.  That the market for your product is huge is mission critical at this point.  Get them excited.
  6. Practice the pitch so much that it seems like you are doing it off the cuff:  The 2 – 3 minute pitch needs to come off as if you are speaking to a friend telling then your companies life story for the first time.  Practice, practice, practice and edit, edit, edit always making the statements shorter, shorter and more concise.
  7. Have less content than time:  If it is a 3 minute pitch have no more than 2 minutes of material.  This way one is never nervous about running over and there is space to let your personality come through and add lib to the audience based on their response to you.
  8. Plan the transitions well: how smoothly one moves from one topic to the next is the mark of a good story teller.  If the transition is logical and seamless it feels more like a story to the audience and not a presentation / pitch.  The more story-like, the more entertaining, the more entertaining the more memorable.
  9. Prepare for Questions: founders often practice, practice, practice the pitch but forget to practice answers to questions.  Come up with a list of the most likely questions and a clear, concise and memorable response.

After considering these pitch tips, it was only a matter of weaving the the story in a sequence that made it progress. Here’s the outline we used:

Happy to report that being the amazing entrepreneur he is, he turned this advice into a pitch competition victory three days later.

We now serve over 100 clients! See who.